cover image of everything all at once

Everything All At Once

In Everything All At Once, high school senior Lottie’s beloved aunt Helen has died of cancer. Helen left Lottie a series of notes to help her deal with her grief and to encourage her to step outside of her very small comfort zone. The notes lead Lottie to Sam, a mysterious boy with a secret that will change Lottie’s world.


Age it’s best for: 13+

Why your child will love it

Everything All At Once feels like many different kinds of novels in one. There’s mystery, suspense, and romance; it’s realistic fiction, and then it has an unexpected fantasy twist near the end. All these things combine to make it a really enjoyable read that has a depth that teenagers will appreciate.

The characters in Everything All At Once are overwhelmingly likeable, and the relationships Lottie has with friends and family are the kind that teens dream of: supportive, understanding, close, and fun.

Lottie’s grief feels real, and many teenagers who’ve experienced the death of a loved one will relate to her sadness and anger, the roller coaster of emotions, and the unexpected things that trigger her sorrow.

Readers who know anxiety will recognize how Lottie experiences anxiety and panic: the tight knot she gets in her stomach, the panicky feeling in her chest, the constant underlying fear of disaster, her anxious inner voice, and the need to keep it all inside for fear that it will overwhelm her.

Everything All At Once feels like many different kinds of novels in one. There’s mystery, suspense, and romance; it’s realistic fiction, and then it has an unexpected fantasy twist near the end. All these things combine to make it a really enjoyable read that has a depth that teenagers will appreciate.

The characters in Everything All At Once are overwhelmingly likeable, and the relationships Lottie has with friends and family are the kind that teens dream of: supportive, understanding, close, and fun.

Lottie’s grief feels real, and many teenagers who’ve experienced the death of a loved one will relate to her sadness and anger, the roller coaster of emotions, and the unexpected things that trigger her sorrow.

Readers who know anxiety will recognize how Lottie experiences anxiety and panic: the tight knot she gets in her stomach, the panicky feeling in her chest, the constant underlying fear of disaster, her anxious inner voice, and the need to keep it all inside for fear that it will overwhelm her.


Why you will love it

Everything All At Once is a book that addresses both grief and anxiety with warmth, tenderness, and humour. Even though it deals with heavy subjects, it’s a positive book that leaves you with the feeling that you can, with help and support, get through dark times.

Tools for dealing with anxiety, like breathing, visualisation, journalling, and listening to music, are written into the story, giving teens the chance to learn about them in a totally non-threatening way.

Diversity is found throughout Everything All At Once, in main and supporting characters. For example, Lottie’s mother is Peruvian, her best friend is a lesbian, one store clerk has dwarfism and another is androgynous and referred to as ‘they.’


Beyond the book

Here are some things you and your child can talk about after reading Everything All At Once:

  • Did your teen see the plot twist coming? What did they think of it?
  • Was it right for Aunt Helen to leave the letters and push Lottie to do those things?
  • If your teenager has experienced the death of a loved one and/or anxiety, ask if Lottie’s experiences felt familiar or different, and in what ways.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This